On a global scale, a staggering 200 million people have problems with their thyroid glands, with over 50 percent remaining undiagnosed. In the US alone, the number of people with thyroid symptoms is running close to epidemic levels and equally as worrying is the number of un-diagnosed or mis-diagnosed cases.

The two most common forms of thyroid disease are Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism and as their names suggest, they are at opposite end of the scale.

When it functions as it should, the thyroid will produce T3 and T4 at a 20% – 80% ratio. An under-production of these hormones will slow down the body’s metabolism, causing Hypothyroidism. Common Hypothyroidism symptoms of this condition are weight-gain despite eating sensibly, feeling cold, fatigue, depression and possibly increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Hyperthyroidism occurs when an excess of T3 and T4 speeds up the body’s metabolism and, if the mild condition is left untreated it can lead to complications such as severe weight-loss despite a healthy appetite, nervousness, staring eyes, accelerated heart rate and insomnia.

Related Conditions

Blood Pressure Problems   A normal measurement for an adult is about 120 over 80 (though blood pressure varies slightly throughout the day depending on what you are doing). However, systolic pressures of 100-140 and diastolic measurements of 60-90 are usually considered within normal bounds. Abnormally high blood pressure is known as hypertension; low blood pressure is called hypotension.

 

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